What’s your Adda?

 

Adda, meaning "a place where people hang out,” is the new restaurant from critically acclaimed artisanal Indian restaurant Rahi owner Roni Mazumdar and Executive Chef Chintan Pandya. Adda holds up to its name with its bright, casual atmosphere; collage wall of Indian newspaper covers; and rustic, "unapologetically" authentic Indian food.

We at Adda believe that food is a conversation of life and want to recreate that dialogue through our ingredient-focused menu. By evoking hints of their own nostalgia, Roni and Chef Chintan have created traditional dishes the way they're meant to be cooked: with a variety of herbs and spices made in-house while staying true to India. It’s unpretentious—think junglee maas, paneer tikka, and masaledar lipatwan murgh. Come with your spice-appreciating friends, and join us for a sensational feast!

 
 


 
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BEST NEW RESTAURANT IN AMERICA 2019
Ranked # 6

“It all arrives fast and fragrant, chaat jockeying for space next to butter chicken, piles of naan brushed with butter, cans of Indian Thums Up soda, and beers sourced from breweries in Queens and Brooklyn. This is the work of Chintan Pandya, who arrived in America six years ago and found it lacking in the sort of food he’d want to eat—the kind of market-driven, high-quality, everyday dishes he’d grown up with. From there, Adda took root. “

— Jordana Rothman, Food & Wine Magazine, 2019

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BEST NEW RESTAURANT IN AMERICA 2019
Semi-Finalist

“A restaurant opened in 2018 that already demonstrates excellence in cuisine and hospitality, and that is likely to make a significant impact in years to come.”

— James Beard Foundation, 2018

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NEW YORK’S TOP 10 RESTAURANTS OF 2018
Ranked # 8

“At Adda, the recipes are traditional, and all of Mr. Pandya’s ebullience goes into the seasoning. This is forcefully spiced food, although chiles aren’t always prominent in the mix. (When they are, buckle up.) Adda may have been meant as a pit stop for students at LaGuardia Community College across the street, but those spices call out so loudly you can almost hear them in Manhattan.”

— Pete Wells, New York Times, 2018